Sourcing vs Recruiting: What’s the Difference?

Khyati Sagar

Senior Writer

sourcing vs recruiting whats the difference guide

In talent acquisition, sourcing and recruiting are two crucial functions that work hand in hand to find and attract the best candidates for a job. Currently, 40% of companies with more than 10 employees are struggling to recruit. This is where strategic sourcing & recruitment comes into the picture. While often used interchangeably, these terms refer to distinct stages in the hiring process, each with its own set of responsibilities and strategies.

 
Looking for Best Recruiting Software?
Check out SoftwareSuggest's list of the best Recruiting Software.

In this blog post, we’ll explore the differences between sourcing and recruiting, as well as the key responsibilities associated with each role.

protip image
Pro-tip

Focus on building strong relationships with candidates through personalized communication. Make sure to leverage data analytics to track and improve recruitment metrics. Continuously adapt your sourcing and recruiting strategies to attract top talent in a competitive market.

What Is Sourcing?

Sourcing is the process of identifying, attracting, and engaging with potential candidates for a job. People who source typically work to build a pipeline of qualified candidates for current and future job openings. They use a variety of methods to find candidates, including online job boards, social media platforms, professional networking sites, and direct outreach.

what is talent sourcing by softwaresuggest

If you’re wondering what a sourcing recruiter is and what they do, keep on reading to check out the responsibilities of a source –

Major Responsibilities of a Sourcer

  • Candidate Research: Sourcers conduct research to identify potential candidates who meet the qualifications for a particular job. This may involve reviewing resumes, searching online databases, and using Boolean search techniques to find relevant candidates.
  • Candidate Outreach: Once potential candidates have been identified, sourcers reach out to them to gauge their interest in the job opportunity. This may involve sending emails, making phone calls, or connecting with candidates on social media.
  • Building Talent Pipelines: Sourcers work to build and maintain a pipeline of qualified candidates for current and future job openings. This involves continually sourcing new candidates and engaging with them to keep them interested in potential job opportunities.
  • Collaboration with Recruiters: Sourcers often work closely with recruiters to ensure a smooth handoff of candidates once they have been identified and expressed interest in a job. They provide recruiters with detailed information about potential candidates to help them make informed decisions about who to move forward in the hiring process.

What Is Recruiting?

Recruiting is a multifaceted process that involves not just evaluating, interviewing, and selecting candidates for a job but also encompasses a range of activities aimed at attracting, engaging, and ultimately hiring the best talent for an organization. Recruiters serve as liaisons between the hiring managers and potential candidates, working closely with both parties to ensure a successful match.

recruiting in HR by softwaresuggest

Recruiters play a crucial role in understanding the hiring needs of the organization, including the specific skills, experience, and qualities required for each position. They work closely with hiring managers to develop job descriptions, identify key selection criteria, and establish recruitment timelines.

Major Responsibilities of a Recruiter

  • Job Posting and Advertising: Recruiters are responsible for writing job descriptions and posting them on job boards, social media, and other relevant platforms. They may also be involved in developing advertising campaigns to attract candidates to open positions.
  • Candidate Screening: Recruiters review resumes and applications to identify candidates who meet the qualifications for a particular job. They may conduct initial phone screens or interviews to further evaluate candidates’ qualifications and fit for the role.
  • Interview Coordination: Recruiters schedule and coordinate interviews between candidates and hiring managers. They may also be responsible for arranging travel and accommodations for out-of-town candidates.
  • Offer Negotiation: Once a candidate has been selected, recruiters may be involved in negotiating job offers, including salary, benefits, and other terms of employment. They work to ensure that both the candidate and the company are satisfied with the offer.
  • Onboarding: Recruiters may also be involved in the onboarding process, ensuring that new hires have everything they need to start their new job successfully.

What is the Difference Between Sourcing and Recruiting?

Recruiting vs sourcing are two essential components of the talent acquisition process, each with its distinct focus and responsibilities. While sourcing is primarily about identifying and attracting potential candidates, recruiting involves evaluating, interviewing, and selecting candidates for specific job openings.  Below is a quick comparison for exploring the difference between recruiting and sourcing

AspectSourcingRecruiting
Definition
The process of identifying, attracting, and engaging with potential candidates for a job.The process of evaluating, interviewing, and selecting candidates for a job.
Focus
Building a pipeline of qualified candidates for current and future job openings.Evaluating candidates to fill specific job openings.
Activities
Candidate research, outreach, and building talent pipelines.Job posting, candidate screening, interview coordination, offer negotiation, onboarding.
Collaboration
Works closely with recruiters to provide them with a pool of qualified candidates.Works closely with hiring managers to understand their hiring needs and find the best candidates.
Goal
To create a pool of potential candidates to meet current and future hiring needs.To fill specific job openings with the best possible candidates.
Timeframe
Ongoing process to continually build and maintain a pipeline of candidates.More focused on filling immediate job openings.
Skills Required
Strong research skills, ability to engage with candidates, and networking skills.Strong communication skills, ability to evaluate candidates, and negotiation skills.
Outcome
Provides a pool of qualified candidates for recruiters to consider.Results in the selection and hiring of a candidate for a specific job.
Metrics
Number of candidates sourced, quality of sourced candidates.Time to fill a position, candidate quality, retention rates.
Tools and Methods
Online job boards, social media, professional networking sites, direct outreach.Job boards, applicant tracking systems, and interview guides.
Importance in Hiring
Critical for building a strong talent pipeline and reducing the time to fill positions.Crucial to ensure that the right candidate is selected for a job, leading to better job performance and retention.
Challenges
Finding qualified candidates in a competitive market and keeping candidates engaged throughout the hiring process.Balancing the needs of hiring managers with candidate expectations, ensuring a positive candidate experience.

Let’s explore the key differences between sourcing and recruiting in more detail:

1. Focus and Purpose

  • Sourcing: The primary focus of sourcing is to identify and attract potential candidates who may be a good fit for a company’s current or future job openings. Sourcers often build a pipeline of qualified candidates to meet the organization’s talent needs over time.
  • Recruiting: Recruiting, on the other hand, is more focused on evaluating and selecting candidates for specific job openings. Recruiters work closely with hiring managers to understand their requirements and find the best candidates to fill those positions.

2. Activities and Responsibilities

  • Sourcing: Sourcers are responsible for conducting candidate research, outreach, and engagement. They use various methods, such as online job boards, social media, and networking events, to identify and attract potential candidates.
  • Recruiting: Recruiters are responsible for screening resumes, conducting interviews, and evaluating candidates’ qualifications and fit for specific job openings. They work closely with hiring managers to coordinate interviews and make final hiring decisions.

3. Relationship with Hiring Managers

  • Sourcing: Sourcers typically work independently or as part of a sourcing team. They may collaborate with recruiters to hand off qualified candidates, but their primary focus is on building and maintaining a talent pipeline.
  • Recruiting: Recruiters work closely with hiring managers throughout the hiring process. They collaborate to define job requirements, review candidates, and make final hiring decisions.

4. Timing and Engagement

  • Sourcing: Sourcing is an ongoing process that involves continuously identifying and engaging with potential candidates, even when there are no immediate job openings. Sourcers aim to build relationships with candidates over time.
  • Recruiting: Recruiting is more focused on filling specific job openings within a defined timeframe. Recruiters engage with candidates who are actively being considered for a particular position.

Conclusion

In conclusion, sourcing and recruiting are both integral parts of the talent acquisition process, each playing a unique role in finding and attracting top talent to organizations. Sourcing focuses on building a pipeline of qualified candidates for current and future job openings, while recruiting is more about evaluating and selecting candidates to fill specific job roles.

Frequently Asked Questions

Both sourcing and recruiting are important in the hiring process. Sourcing lays the foundation by building a pool of qualified candidates while recruiting focuses on selecting the best candidate for a specific job.

Sourcing in recruiting refers to the process of identifying, attracting, and engaging with potential candidates for a job. It involves building a pipeline of qualified candidates for current and future job openings.

Common tools for sourcing include online job boards, social media platforms, professional networking sites, and direct outreach. For recruiting, tools such as applicant tracking systems, job boards, interview guides, and communication platforms are commonly used.

In most organizational structures, recruiters are considered higher in the hierarchy than sourcers. Recruiters are responsible for evaluating, interviewing, and selecting candidates for specific job openings, while sourcers focus on building a pipeline of qualified candidates for recruiters to consider.

Google News
subscribe image
Let’s Stay in Touch

Subscribe to our newsletter & never miss our latest news and promotions.

people subscribed+21K people have already subscribed 
Related Articles
sitemap
Share This